Coach Ken Carter: I end up taking a road trip to the suburbs where I find my drunk ass point guard on top of Daddy's little princess.
Worm: Actually, I was on the bottom, coach, she was on the top.

[to the people in attendance at the board hearing] You really need to consider the message you're sending this boys by ending the lockout. It's the same message that we as a culture send to our professional athletes; and that is that they are above the law. If these boys cannot honor the simple rules of a basketball contract, how long do you think it will be before they're out there breaking the law? I played ball here at Richmond High 30 years ago. It was the same thing then; some of my teammates went to prison, some of them even ended up dead. If you vote to end the lockout, you won't have to terminate me; I'll quit.

Coach Ken Carter

Coach Ken Carter: What's your deepest fear?
Worm: Why he keep saying that? What's your deepest fear? What's that mean?

When we step on the floor every second that clock is ticking, we are pedal to the metal, we run the ball, we pressure the ball, and most importantly we control the tempo of the game, we make them play Richmond Oiler ball.

Coach Ken Carter

Kenyon Stone: [running lines] Yo, how many we gonna do?
Coach Ken Carter: Sir.
Kenyon Stone: Yo, sir, how many we gonna do?
Coach Ken Carter: Let's see how many you can do in... one hour and seven minutes.

Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness, that most frightens us. Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won't feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine as children do. It's not just in some of us; it is in everyone. And as we let our own lights shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others.

Timo Cruz

Tom Stall: [Seeing Edie walk into his hospital room] Edie... Honey, are you okay?
Edie Stall: Tell me the truth.
Tom Stall: The truth?
Edie Stall: Please, you can do that, can't you? You can do that... can't you, please?
Tom Stall: What do you think you heard?
Edie Stall: It's not what I heard... it's what I saw. I saw Joey. I saw you turn into Joey right before my eyes. I saw a killer, the one Fogarty warned me about. You did kill men back in Philly, didn't you? Did you do it for money? Or did you do it because you enjoyed it?
Tom Stall: Joey did, both. I didn't. Tom Stall didn't.

Ruben: Got to frisk you.
Tom Stall: Nah, I'll save you the trouble. I'm not packing.
Ruben: I got to frisk you.
Tom Stall: All right. I don't smell very good... I've been driving pretty much non-stop fifteen to sixteen hours.
Ruben: I'll hold my nose.

Bobby Jordan: [Pushing Jack into the lockers] Make me laugh, asshole.
Judy Danvers: Jack, come on, he's an asshole.
Bobby Jordan: Shut the fuck up skank.
Jack Stall: [Jack kicks Bobby's buddy in the groin and moves to Bobby] Come her you fuck!
[Jack punches Bobby and brings him to the ground]
Jack Stall: You cocksucking motherfucker!

Carl Fogaty: Any last words before I blow your brains out you miserable prick?
Tom Stall: [now speaking as Joey Cusack] I should have killed you back in Philly.
Carl Fogaty: [Smiles] Yeah Joey, you should have.

Tom Stall: In this family, we do not solve problems by hitting people!
Jack Stall: No, in this family, we shoot them!

If I rob Mulligan's pharmacy, are you going to ground me if I don't give you a piece of the action? If I go to Sam about you, will you have me whacked?

Jack Stall

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