[Will and John are stuck under the rubble] I guess you're not much of a talker.

Will Jimeno

Are you guys ready? Let's roll! Come on, let's go!

Todd Beamer

Title card: Of the four aircraft hijacked that day, United 93 was the only one that did not reach its target. It crashed near Shanksville, Pennsylvania at 10:03am. No one survived.
Title card: Military commanders were not notified that United 93 had been hijacked until four minutes after it had crashed. The nearest fighter jets were 100 miles away.
Title card: At 10:18am, the President authorized the military to engage hijacked aircraft. Fearing an accidental shoot down, military commanders chose not to pass the order to pilots in the air.
Title card: By 12:06pm every civilian airliner over America had been forced to land. Amidst an unprecedented military mobilization, US airspace was closed until further notice.
Title card: Dedicated to the memory of all those who lost their lives on September 11, 2001.

We have some planes...

Mohammed Atta

Captain Jason Dahl: Two planes have crashed into the World Trade Center? We just flew out of Newark and the weather was beautiful!
First Officer LeRoy Homer: Must have been student pilots.

We have to do something, they are not going to land this plane.

Thomas E. Burnett, Jr.

Hi mom, its me... this really kind woman handed me the phone and told me to call you.

Elizabeth Wainio

Ziad Jarrah: [Message Flashes: "Beware cockpit intrusion. Two aircraft have hit the world Trade Center] The brothers have hit both targets!
Saeed Al Ghamdi: Should I tell the others?
Ziad Jarrah: Yes. Tell them our time has come! Our time has come!

Ziad Jarrah: [subtitled] What are you doing here?
Ahmed Al Nami: Why are we waiting?
Ziad Jarrah: It's not the right time. Sit and I will give you the sign.
Ahmed Al Nami: When?
Ziad Jarrah: Go and sit down.
Ahmed Al Nami: We have to do it now, Ziad.
Deborah Welsh: [interrupting] Would you like anything to drink?
Ziad Jarrah: [in English] No, I'm fine. Thank you.
Deborah Welsh: Sure?
Ziad Jarrah: Yes.

[subtitled] Ziad. It's time.

Ahmed Al Haznawi

[narrating] Our mission was called "a successful failure," in that we returned safely but never made it to the Moon. In the following months, it was determined that a damaged coil built inside the oxygen tank sparked during our cryo stir and caused the explosion that crippled the Odyssey. It was a minor defect that occured two years before I was even named the flight's commander. Fred Haise was going back to the moon on Apollo 18, but his mission was cancelled because of budget cuts; he never flew in space again. Nor did Jack Swigert, who left the astronaut corps and was elected to Congress from the state of Colorado. But he died of cancer before he was able to take office. Ken Mattingly orbited the moon as Command Module Pilot of Apollo 16, and flew the Space Shuttle, having never gotten the measles. Gene Kranz retired as Director of Flight Operations just not long ago. And many other members of Mission Control have gone on to other things, but some are still there. As for me, the seven extraordinary days of Apollo 13 were my last in space. I watched other men walk on the Moon, and return safely, all from the confines of Mission Control and our house in Houston. I sometimes catch myself looking up at the Moon, remembering the changes of fortune in our long voyage, thinking of the thousands of people who worked to bring the three of us home. I look up at the Moon and wonder, when will we be going back, and who will that be?

Jim Lovell

We've never lost an American in space, we're sure as hell not gonna lose one on my watch! Failure is not an option.

Gene Kranz

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