Maria: Dear Father, now I know why You sent me here. To help these children prepare for a new mother. And I pray this will become a happy family in Thy sight. God bless the captain. God bless Liesl and Friedrich. God bless Louisa, Brigitta, Marta and little Gretl. And I forgot the other boy. What's his name? Well, God bless what's-his-name. God bless the Reverend Mother and Sister Margaretta and everybody at the abbey. And now, dear God, about Liesl. Help her know that I'm her friend and help her tell me what she's been up to.
Liesl: Are you going to tell on me?
Maria: Help me to be understanding so I may guide her footsteps. In the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost.
Liesl: I was out walking and somebody locked the doors early. I didn't want to wake everybody, so when I saw your window open. You're not going to tell Father, are you?
Maria: How in the world did you climb up here?
Liesl: It's how we always got in to play tricks on the governess. Louisa can make it with a whole jar of spiders in her hand.
Maria: Spiders? Liesl, were you out walking all by yourself? If we wash that dress tonight, nobody would notice it tomorrow. You could put this on. Take your dress and put it to soak in the bathtub. Come back here and sit on the bed, and we'll have a talk.
Liesl: I told you today I didn't need a governess. Well, maybe I do.

Maria: I'd like to thank each and every one of you for the precious gift you left in my pocket today.
Captain von Trapp: Um, what gift?
Maria: It's meant to be a secret, Captain, between the children and me.
Captain von Trapp: Uh-huh. Then I suggest that you keep it, and let us eat.
Maria: Knowing how nervous I must have been, a stranger in a new household, knowing how important it was for me to feel accepted. It was so kind and thoughtful of you to make my first moments here so warm and happy and... pleasant.
[All the while, the children look guilty. Marta starts to cry]
Captain von Trapp: What is the matter, Marta?
Marta: Nothing.
[Louisa, Brigitta and Gretl join in, while Liesl, Friedrich and Kurt continue to look guilty]
Captain von Trapp: Uh, Fräulein... is it to be at every meal, or merely at dinnertime, that you, uh, intend leading us all through this rare and wonderful new world of... indigestion?
Maria: Oh, they're all right, Captain. They're just happy.
[All of the girls, except Liesl, continue to cry out of guilt]

Captain von Trapp: They haven't complained yet.
Maria: Well, they wouldn't dare! They love you too much. They "fear" you too much!
Captain von Trapp: I don't wish you to discuss my children in this manner.
Maria: Well, you've got to hear from someone! You're never home long enough to know them.
Captain von Trapp: I said I don't want to hear anymore from you about my children!
Maria: I know you don't, but you've got to! Now, take Liesl.
Captain von Trapp: [hesitatingly] You will not say one word about Liesl, Fraulein.
Maria: She's not a child anymore, and one of these days, you're going to wake up and find that she's a woman. You won't even know her. And Friedrich, he's a boy, but he wants to be a man and there's no one to show him how.
Captain von Trapp: Don't you dare tell me about my son.
Maria: Brigitta could tell you about him if you let her get close to you. She notices everything.
Captain von Trapp: Fraulein...
Maria: And Kurt pretends he's tough not to show how hurt he is when you brush him aside,
Captain von Trapp: That will do!
Maria: the way you do all of them. Louisa I don't even know about yet,
Captain von Trapp: I said that will do!
Maria: but somebody has to find out about her, and the little ones just want to be loved. Oh, please, Captain, love them! Love them all!
Captain von Trapp: I don't care to hear anything further from you about my children.
Maria: I am not finished yet, Captain!
Captain von Trapp: Oh, yes, you are, Captain!
[pauses, then corrects himself]
Captain von Trapp: Fraulein!

It's the new small talk. You do it so awfully well.

Freddy Eynsford-Hill

Professor Henry Higgins: How poignant it will be on that inevitable night, when she shows up on my door in tears and rags! Miserable and lonely, repentant and contrite! Shall I take her in, or hurl her to the wolves? Give her kindness, or the treatment she deserves? Will I take her back, or THROW THE BAGGAGE OUT? Well, I'm a most forgiving man. The sort who never could, ever would, take a position and staunchly never budge. A "most" forgiving man... But, I shall NEVER take her back! If she were crawling on her KNEES! Let her promise to atone, let her shiver, let her moan, I'll slam the door and let the hellcat FREEZE! Marry Freddy! HA!
[turns to unlock the door, but stops in despair]
Professor Henry Higgins: But I'm so used to hear her say, "Good morning" every day... Her joys, her woes, her highs, her lows, are second nature to me now, like breathing out and breathing in... I'm very grateful she's a woman, and so easy to forget! Rather like a habit one can always break... And yet... I've grown accustomed to the trace... of something in the air... Accustomed... to her... face.

Why can't a woman be more like a man?

Professor Henry Higgins

She's an owl, sickened by a few days of "my" sunshine.

Professor Henry Higgins

I ain't dirty! I washed my face and hands before I come, I did.

Eliza Doolittle

Eliza Doolittle: [singing] I shall not feel alone without you, I can stand on my own without you. So go back in your shell, I can do bloody well without...
Professor Henry Higgins: [singing] By George, I really did it, I did it, I did it! I said I'd make a woman and indeed, I did. I knew that I could do it, I knew it, I knew it! I said I'd make a woman and succeed, I did!
[speaking]
Professor Henry Higgins: Eliza, you're magnificent. Five minutes ago, you were a millstone around my neck, and now you're a tower of strength, a consort battleship. I like you this way.
[pause]
Eliza Doolittle: Goodbye, Professor Higgins. You shall not be seeing me again.

Professor Henry Higgins: You see, the great secret, Eliza, is not a question of good manners or bad manners, or any particular sort of manners, but having the same manner for all human souls. The question is not whether I treat you rudely, but whether you've ever heard me treat anyone else better.
Eliza Doolittle: I don't care how you treat me. I don't mind your swearing at me. I shouldn't mind a black eye; I've had one before this. But I won't be passed over!
Professor Henry Higgins: Well then, get out of my way, for I won't stop for you. You talk about me as though I were a motor bus.
Eliza Doolittle: So you are a motor bus! All bounce and go, and no consideration for anybody. But I can get along without you. Don't you think I can't!
Professor Henry Higgins: I know you can. I told you you could.
[pause]
Professor Henry Higgins: [quietly] You've never wondered, I suppose, whether... whether I could get along without you.
Eliza Doolittle: Well, you have my voice on your phonograph. When you feel lonesome without me you can turn it on. It has no feelings to hurt.
Professor Henry Higgins: I... I can't turn your soul on.
Eliza Doolittle: Ooh, you are a "devil". You can twist the heart in a girl the same way some fellows twist her arms to hurt her!

I know your head aches; I know you're tired; I know your nerves are as raw as meat in a butcher's window. But think what you're trying to accomplish. Think what you're dealing with. The majesty and grandeur of the English language, it's the greatest possession we have. The noblest thoughts that ever flowed through the hearts of men are contained in its extraordinary, imaginative, and musical mixtures of sounds. And that's what you've set yourself out to conquer Eliza. And conquer it you will.

Professor Henry Higgins

"You" won my bet? You presumptuous insect, "I" won it.

Professor Henry Higgins

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