You lay life on a table and cut out all the tumors of injustice. Marvelous.

Yuri Andreiivich, you've changed. Larisa - remarkably the same.

Komarovski

Gen. Yevgraf Zhivago: [narrating; on World War I] By the second winter, the boots had worn out... but the line still held. Even Comrade Lenin underestimated both the anguish of that 900-mile long front... as well our own cursed capacity for suffering. Half the men went into action without any arms... irregular rations... led by officers they didn't trust.
Officer: [to soldiers] Come on, you bastards!
Gen. Yevgraf Zhivago: And those they did trust...
Pasha: [leaps out of the trench and begins leading his men in a charge] Come on, Comrades! Forward, comrades! Earth-shakers!
Gen. Yevgraf Zhivago: Finally, when they could stand it no longer, they began doing what every army dreams of doing...
Gen. Yevgraf Zhivago: They began to go home. That was the beginning of the Revolution.

[narrating over a military parade in Moscow] In bourgeois terms, it was a war between the Allies and Germany. In Bolshevik terms, it was a war between the Allied and German upper classes - and which of them won was of total indifference. My task was to organize defeat, so as to hasten the onset of revolution. I enlisted under the name of Petrov. The party looked to the peasant conscript soldiers - many of whom were wearing their first real pair of boots. When the boots had worn out, they'd be ready to listen. When the time came, I was able to take three whole battalions out of the front lines with me - the best day's work I ever did. But for now, there was nothing to be done. There were too many volunteers. Most of it was mere hysteria.

Gen. Yevgraf Zhivago

Pasha: I used to admire your poetry.
Zhivago: Thank you.
Pasha: I shouldn't admire it now. I should find it absurdly personal. Don't you agree? Feelings, insights, affections... it's suddenly trivial now. You don't agree; you're wrong. The personal life is dead in Russia. History has killed it. I can see why you might hate me.
Zhivago: I hate everything you say, but not enough to kill you for it.

Pasha: The private life is dead - for a man with any manhood.
Zhivago: I saw some of your 'manhood' on the way at a place called Minsk.
Pasha: They were selling horses to the Whites.
Zhivago: It seems you've burnt the wrong village.
Pasha: They always say that, and what does it matter? A village betrays us, a village is burned. The point's made.
Zhivago: Your point - their village.

I am the only free man on this train! And the rest of you are CATTLE!

Kostoyed Amourski

Liberius: Comrade Doctor, I need a medical officer. Zhivago: I'm sorry, I have a wife and child in Varykino.
Razin, Liberius' Lieutenant: ...and a mistress in Yuriatin.
Liberius: [laughs] Comrade Medical Officer, we are Red partisans, and we SHOOT deserters!

Liberius: [looking at the bodies of slain White soldiers, whom he was found to be teenagers] St. Michael's Military School?
Liberius: You old bastard!

Razin, Liberius' Lieutenant: [Zhivago is trying to aide a wounded White soldier] It does not matter!
Zhivago: Have you ever loved a woman, Razin? Razin, Liberius' Lieutenant: I once had a wife and four children.

Liberius: [Liberius and Razin are debating whether or not to allow Zhivago's release] I command this unit!
Razin, Liberius' Lieutenant: We command jointly! The Party Bulletin expressly states...
Liberius: Bah! I could have you taken out and shot!
Razin, Liberius' Lieutenant: And could you have The Party taken out and shot? Understand this

Gromeko: [reading newspaper] They've shot the Czar. And all his family.
Gromeko: Oh, that's a savage deed. What's it for?
Zhivago: It's to show there's no going back.

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Doctor Zhivago Quotes

Pasha: The private life is dead - for a man with any manhood.
Zhivago: I saw some of your 'manhood' on the way at a place called Minsk.
Pasha: They were selling horses to the Whites.
Zhivago: It seems you've burnt the wrong village.
Pasha: They always say that, and what does it matter? A village betrays us, a village is burned. The point's made.
Zhivago: Your point - their village.

Who are you to refuse my sugar? Who are you to refuse me anything?

Komarovski