We have to do something, they are not going to land this plane.

Thomas E. Burnett, Jr.

Hi mom, its me... this really kind woman handed me the phone and told me to call you.

Elizabeth Wainio

Ziad Jarrah: [Message Flashes: "Beware cockpit intrusion. Two aircraft have hit the world Trade Center] The brothers have hit both targets!
Saeed Al Ghamdi: Should I tell the others?
Ziad Jarrah: Yes. Tell them our time has come! Our time has come!

Ziad Jarrah: [subtitled] What are you doing here?
Ahmed Al Nami: Why are we waiting?
Ziad Jarrah: It's not the right time. Sit and I will give you the sign.
Ahmed Al Nami: When?
Ziad Jarrah: Go and sit down.
Ahmed Al Nami: We have to do it now, Ziad.
Deborah Welsh: [interrupting] Would you like anything to drink?
Ziad Jarrah: [in English] No, I'm fine. Thank you.
Deborah Welsh: Sure?
Ziad Jarrah: Yes.

[subtitled] Ziad. It's time.

Ahmed Al Haznawi

[narrating] Our mission was called "a successful failure," in that we returned safely but never made it to the Moon. In the following months, it was determined that a damaged coil built inside the oxygen tank sparked during our cryo stir and caused the explosion that crippled the Odyssey. It was a minor defect that occured two years before I was even named the flight's commander. Fred Haise was going back to the moon on Apollo 18, but his mission was cancelled because of budget cuts; he never flew in space again. Nor did Jack Swigert, who left the astronaut corps and was elected to Congress from the state of Colorado. But he died of cancer before he was able to take office. Ken Mattingly orbited the moon as Command Module Pilot of Apollo 16, and flew the Space Shuttle, having never gotten the measles. Gene Kranz retired as Director of Flight Operations just not long ago. And many other members of Mission Control have gone on to other things, but some are still there. As for me, the seven extraordinary days of Apollo 13 were my last in space. I watched other men walk on the Moon, and return safely, all from the confines of Mission Control and our house in Houston. I sometimes catch myself looking up at the Moon, remembering the changes of fortune in our long voyage, thinking of the thousands of people who worked to bring the three of us home. I look up at the Moon and wonder, when will we be going back, and who will that be?

Jim Lovell

We've never lost an American in space, we're sure as hell not gonna lose one on my watch! Failure is not an option.

Gene Kranz

Houston, we have a problem.

Jim Lovell

NASA Director: This could be the worst disaster NASA's ever faced.
Gene Kranz: With all due respect, sir, I believe this is gonna be our finest hour.

Congressman: Now Jim, people in my state keep asking why we're continuing to fund this program now that we've beaten the Russians to the Moon.
Jim Lovell: Imagine if Christopher Columbus had come back from the New World and no one returned in his footsteps.

Fred Haise, Sr.: I know why my numbers were wrong. I only figured it for two people.
Jack Swigert: Maybe I should just hold my breath.

Jack Swigert: Now wait a minute... all I did was stir those tanks...
Fred Haise, Sr.: What was that gauge reading before you hit the switch?
Jack Swigert: Hey, don't tell me how to fly the damned CM, all right? They brought me in here to do a job, they asked me to stir the damned tanks, and I stirred the tanks!
Fred Haise, Sr.: You didn't know what you were doing, do you?
Jim Lovell: Jack, quit kicking yourself in the ass.
Jack Swigert: This is NOT MY FAULT!
Jim Lovell: No one is saying it is. If I'm in the left-hand seat when the call comes up, I stir the tanks.
Jack Swigert: Yeah, well, tell HIM that.

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